Study Shows Distracted Driving Is the Leading Cause of Accidents Among Teenage Motorists

by | April 13th, 2015

distracted driving

Distracted driving has become increasingly prevalent with today’s technology.

The Pervasiveness of Distracted Driving

Take a look around you next time you’re driving and you may be surprised at the number of motorists who simply aren’t paying attention to the road. What may be even more surprising to some is just how prevalent the behavior of distracted driving has become—especially among inexperienced teenage drivers.

Common Causes of Distracted Driving

The Cleveland car accident lawyers with Nurenberg, Paris, Heller & McCarthy explain that a new study shows up to 58 percent of motor vehicle collisions involving adolescent drivers are caused by a distraction behind the wheel. Researchers came to this conclusion after analyzing more than 6,800 videos of teen drivers operating motor vehicles.

Of those videos, CBS News reports approximately 1,700 accidents captured on video were caused by a distraction. While many may think using electronic devices would be the most common cause of distraction, looking for, or at, an object accounted for the greatest number of accidents. In fact, looking away from the road caused one quarter of the crashes that were recorded. Another 15 percent of accidents were the result of a driver conversing with another passenger in the vehicle, while cellphone use only accounted for 12 percent of distracted driving accidents. Singing to music and grooming rounded out the contributing factors that were identified, each accounting for 6 percent of the collisions.

Preventing Distracted Driving

You may be asking yourself, “What can I do to protect myself and my teen from distracted driving?” Experts agree that repeatedly having an honest and open dialogue with young motorists about the dangers of distracted driving is one of the most effective methods for preventing such accidents. The Cleveland personal injury attorneys with Nurenberg, Paris, Heller & McCarthy also suggest creating a driving contract with your teenager that outlines the rules of the road. This contract should include rules limiting speed, cellphone use, hours of operation, and, most importantly, the number of passengers that can be in the vehicle at any given time.