Bad Weather Responsible For New Mexico Airplane Crash That Killed Four

by | March 8th, 2013

March 8, 2013

A New Mexico Airplane Crash Sunday claimed the lives of all four passengers aboard the aircraft. The Houston Chronicle released an article saying the incident occurred at approximately 1:30 p.m. along the landing strip at a ski resort in the northern region of the state.

Airport manager, Harvey Wright, explained winds were gusting up to 55 mph at the airfield in the moments before the accident occurred. He added that when the 33-year-old pilot attempted to take off from the field, the plane was forced back down by strong gusts.

Wright went on to point out the pilot had ample warning of the dangers the weather conditions could pose, but decided to go up anyway. The pilot stated he was comfortable with the aircraft and his abilities in those conditions.

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) say they will continue to examine the cause of the crash; however, with a significant number of accidents involving aircraft of similar size and type, the agency is considering a requirement for all pilots to receive recurring training in weather sources and technology.

The Personal Injury Attorneys with the law firm of Nurenberg, Paris, Heller & McCarthy are aware of the dangers flying in inclement weather can present. That’s why the firm applauds any effort made to further educated pilots about these risks.