NTSB Issues Warning Regarding Safety Of Two Jet Engines

by | September 21st, 2012

September 21, 2012

This past week, a press release from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) issued a pair of warnings regarding the General Electric (GE) GEnx-1B and GEnx -2B jet engines, saying there had been two reported instances of mid-shaft fan blades in the engine developing cracks.

The NTSB began looking into potential risks with the engines after officials with the agency witnessed a Boeing 787 experience an engine failure during a pre-flight taxi test run on July 28, 2012, in Charleston, South Carolina. A little more than a month later, another Boeing 787 under inspection was found to have a broken fan blade in one of its engines. Both aircraft were immediately grounded and underwent rigorous repairs.

While most of the engines have undergone an ultrasonic testing to determine the integrity of each fan blade, 43 engines have yet to be examined by the NTSB and are still considered at risk of experiencing a mid-shaft failure that could result in an aviation accident. The agency went on to say that each of the engines must be examined and tested on a consistent basis throughout the remainder of the machine’s lifespan.

Statistics show that mechanical failures like this are the second leading cause of plane crashes.

The Cleveland personal injury lawyers at Nurenberg, Paris, Heller & McCarthy aim to improve aviation safety by fighting for those who have been hurt or lost loved ones while flying because of another person’s negligence.