Veterans Still Struggling To Receive Quality Care For Gulf War Illness

by | February 6th, 2013

February 6, 2013

Estimates gauge that of the 700,000 soldiers who fought in Iraq during the Gulf War that occurred in the early 90s, a total of 250,000 have developed a condition known as Gulf War Illness. A story published by the Dayton Daily News told the story of one veteran’s struggle with the disease and his battle with the Department of Veteran Affairs for proper treatment of his condition.

The article told of how the 46-year-old Springfield, Ohio, man was operating an armored vehicle carrying troops when a shell from a tank that contained depleted uranium suddenly struck it. The soldier was left with roughly 10 pieces of shrapnel from the round in his leg and has since developed health concerns. His legs swell, he sweats excessively, and has constant aches in his joints throughout his body.

While the veteran is convinced that he, and others like him, was exposed to a hazard during his time overseas, the Department of Veteran Affairs hasn’t been as quick to accept this reasoning and has stated the cause of Gulf War Illness may never be determined.

In the meantime, these individuals are left with few treatment options and little assistance from Veterans’ Disability Benefits.

The law firm of Nurenberg, Paris, Heller & McCarthy has a team of Ohio Injury Lawyers who have successfully handled veterans’ disability litigation in the past and are here to help you if injuries you sustained during service to your country have left you unable to work.