Ohio Lawmakers Shoot Down Move To Allow Heavier Trucks On Secondary Roads

by | April 5th, 2013

April 5, 2013

Lawmakers in Ohio have killed a bill that would have allowed larger commercial vehicles on secondary roads in the state. The move was struck down due to not only concerns over and increase in maintenance costs, but also because of a potential increase in the number of Ohio Truck Accidents.

According to an article published in a recent issue of Land Line, House Bill 35 would have allowed commercial vehicles weighing up to 90,000 pounds to be able to drive on local and non-interstate roads with no penalties. Those in favor of the bill said it would be effective in boosting the state’s income revenue while posing a minimal threat to motorist safety. Opponents of the law believe the contrary.

Andy Young, a member of the Owner-Operator Independent Driver’s Association, stated he believes “vehicle stability, mobility, and maneuverability” of tractor-trailers would each be significantly compromised if the law were enacted. This would not only put trucker’s lives at risk, but also that of every other motorist around them as well.

The Senate Transportation Committee agreed and decided the bill should no longer be considered.

Nurenberg, Paris, Heller & McCarthy and their team of Ohio Personal Injury Attorneys applaud the efforts being made by lawmakers to keep the motoring public safe from the harms larger and heavier vehicles can pose. The firm also encourages anyone who has been hurt in a crash caused by a commercial vehicle to discuss your case with an attorney immediately.