What Is “Discovery” in an Injury Case?

by NPHM | January 21st, 2019

At Nurenberg Paris, we do everything in our power to help auto accident victims like you get maximum compensation after injuries. One of the ways we do that is by collecting evidence that proves our clients weren’t at fault for their accidents. However, the evidence we collect may be viewed by the other driver and his or her attorney.

That’s because the American legal system requires that both sides of civil and criminal cases share evidence and facts with each other before proceedings begin. That process is called discovery, and it’s designed to prevent either side from being caught off-guard by previously unknown information.

How Does Discovery Work?

There are four steps that are completed in almost all cases where discovery takes place. Those steps include:

  • Interrogatories—Both sides will present written questions to each other. Those questions are designed to obtain basic facts, such as names, contact information, insurance details, descriptions of injuries, medical treatment received, and medical histories.
  • Request for Production—Official documents and records are important evidence in auto accident claims. A request for production allows both sides equal access to things like official accident reports, medical records, insurance policies, accident scene photographs, and property damage receipts.
  • Request for Admission—A request for admission means that both parties must write official statements concerning the facts of the auto accident and submit them to each other. Then, both sides must agree on, deny, or object to those statements within a timely fashion.
  • Deposition—Recorded and transcribed by court reporters, depositions are in-person interviews that are designed to capture both sides’ personal accounts and recollections of the auto accident. Recorded depositions or transcribed statements may be used during trial to corroborate testimony.

The legal process may feel intimidating if you’re going through it for the first time, but we’re here to help—both during the discovery process and beyond. Call our Ohio auto accident lawyers today for a free consultation.